RogerBW's Blog

Killjoys season 1 22 February 2016

2015, 10 episodes. Space bounty hunters discover that being apolitical is really hard work if you have even the vestiges of a conscience.

If there is generic sci-fi in the same way that there is generic fantasy, this is the sort of thing it has in it. Spaceships, an indentured underclass, oppressive corporations, tiny robot weapons, secret projects that mess with people's minds and bodies, high-tech knives, and gunfights.

The show was created by Michelle Lovretta, who's also known for Lost Girl – which I rather liked, particularly in its first season, though I wouldn't call it great TV. (Review coming when I've finished the final season.) And this isn't either, but it is that rare thing, consistently pretty good TV, with no wasted episodes. The plots are recycled, sure, but all plots are recycled to some extent. The tech base is basically undefined: it's background magic that allows us to have grungy spaceships where nobody ever needs to worry about how much fuel they have left. Character complexity takes a while to kick off and never goes terribly deep, though it's frankly more than I'd expected.

The leads are appealing, particularly Aaron Ashmore, rather less bland than he was in Warehouse 13, as the techie; Hannah-John Kamen as the ass-kicking boss can be great but is very patchy. After all, if you're not going to employ an actual martial artist to play your martial artist, a dancer who knows a bunch of different styles is probably the next-best option; the problems come when she plays "sexy" rather than "competent" and ends up being relatively unconvincing. Aaron Ashmore doesn't reach the same heights, but is rather more consistently good. Luke Macfarlane as a space grunt with a Troubled Past is probably the most clichéd, but even he manages moments of interest.

So yes, it's skiffy spackle, but it's pretty decent skiffy spackle with some sensible things to say about economic oppression. The series has been renewed for another season.

[Buy this at Amazon] and help support the blog.


  1. Posted by Ashley R Pollard at 07:18pm on 06 March 2016

    So any chance of a summary to compare and contrast with Dark Matter? As in which you would buy?

Comments on this post are now closed. If you have particular grounds for adding a late comment, comment on a more recent post quoting the URL of this one.

Search
Archive
Tags 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010s 3d printing action aeronautics aikakirja anecdote animation anime army astronomy audio tech base commerce battletech beer boardgaming bookmonth chain of command children chronicle church of no redeeming virtues cold war comedy computing contemporary cornish smuggler cosmic encounter coup cycling dead of winter doctor who documentary drama driving drone ecchi espionage essen 2015 essen 2016 essen 2017 existential risk falklands war fandom fantasy film firefly first world war flash point food garmin drive gazebo geodata gin gurps gurps 101 harpoon historical history horror hugo 2014 hugo 2015 hugo 2016 hugo 2017 hugo-nebula reread humour in brief avoid instrumented life kickstarter learn to play leaving earth linux mecha museum mystery naval non-fiction one for the brow opera perl photography podcast politics powers prediction privacy project woolsack pyracantha quantum rail ranting raspberry pi reading reading boardgames social real life restaurant reviews romance rpg a day rpgs science fiction scythe second world war security shipwreck simutrans smartphone south atlantic war squaddies stationery steampunk stuarts suburbia superheroes suspense television the resistance thirsty meeples thriller tin soldier torg toys trailers travel vietnam war war wargaming weather wives and sweethearts writing about writing x-wing young adult
Special All book reviews, All film reviews
Produced by aikakirja v0.1